Snouter Meets Ian the Vet

Snouter whom I managed to coax out for some breakfast this morning, holding his poorly front right trotter

Snouter whom I managed to coax out for some breakfast this morning, holding his poorly front right trotter

As readers of this blog may remember, my poor, beautiful piglet, Snouter, also known

Clever Penny Pig who has learned how to tip her trough to get every drop; Snouter does not know how to do this

Clever Penny Pig who has learned how to tip her trough to get every drop; Snouter does not know how to do this

as Snoutychops has poorly trotters.  He has deep cracks in the pads of his hooves and some abnormally raised pads, part of one of which had become detached and was clearly causing him a lot of pain.  This is mostly due to the awful effect the weather has had on the ground: alternately hard and wet and boggy.  Also, we think he has a pre-disposition towards it too.

I spent quite a bit of time with Snouter and Penny Pig over the Easter break and was very concerned when he wouldn’t come out to eat his breakfast, eschewing his hot porridge, potato and carrot mix, not just preferring to stay in his piggie bed, but it seemed that he was hungry but in too much pain to get up.

Snouter making his way on the softest ground possible to go outside for his afternoon nap. Ok, I bribed him with apples for I thought that a bit of weak winter sun on his fur may make him feel better

Snouter making his way on the softest ground possible to go outside for his afternoon nap. Ok, I bribed him with apples for I thought that a bit of weak winter sun on his fur may make him feel better

Time to get the vet in.  I arranged for the vet to come last

Snouter making his way gingerly down the old goat manure heap

Snouter making his way gingerly down the old goat manure heap

Thursday and took the day off.  We had a new vet, a lovely man called Ian from Dalehead Vetinarary Group in Settle who had worked with pigs in his previous practice, so that was really good to know and he was very patient with poor old Snouty.

That's better, weight off my feet and slumbering in the weak sun

That’s better, weight off my feet and slumbering in the weak sun

I introduced Snouter to Ian who was very suspicious (Snouter,

Close up of a poorly trotter - does anyone out there have any experience of this in pigs?

Close up of a poorly trotter – does anyone out there have any experience of this in pigs?

not Ian) and it took an age to settle Snouter down in his bed.  We don’t get many visitors and I suppose I am the only person who handles Penny Pig and Snouter, so they are not used to strangers.  Aided by a head torch and my big torch, I managed to coax Snouter over on his side, stroked his tummy so that he would shift over so we could see his trotters.

Another close up of Snouter's trotter

Another close up of Snouter’s trotter

Snouter got a bit unsettled, to put it politely, when Ian got a little

Snouter's poorly tummy with pustule like spots - anyone know what this is?

Snouter’s poorly tummy with pustule like spots – anyone know what this is?

too close to his trotters and Ian backed out of the piggie bed and when he straightened up said that he wouldn’t want to get on the wrong end of Snouter.  The verdict is that the pain medicine I am giving him is not working because I am not giving him enough.  Ian reckoned that Snouter weighs in the region of 500 kgs and Penny Pig around 350 kgs and the

Another picture of Snouter's spots

Another picture of Snouter’s spots

dose I was giving him was for a smaller sized piggie.  Also, we need to keep his trotters moist and supple and stop them from drying out and cracking more.  A big thank you to Ian and his patience and advice – much appreciated.

But 500 kgs!  This was a bit of a reality check and really surprised

Snouter had just been down to the stream to take a drink of water and lay down in one of his favourite dirt craters

Snouter had just been down to the stream to take a drink of water and lay down in one of his favourite dirt craters

me; no wonder sometimes I feel a little nervous when Snouter rubs against my leg, thinking that one day it is going to break.  I now have some Fuciderm cream to rub into Snouty’s trotters – which is um..interesting, though he is mostly patient with me and I try to be as gentle as possible and after three days, I need to rub in vaseline to keep his trotters moist and supple.  I also gave him one very large shot of pain medicine which seems to have perked him up a little.

Penny Pig, meanwhile just stayed inside all afternoon

Penny Pig, meanwhile just stayed inside all afternoon

We had some sunshine on Saturday and I was really pleased that Snouter not only got out of his piggie pit and had breakfast, but with a little bit of apple bribery ventured out into the paddock and lay down to sleep in the sunshine.  This has to be a really good sign.  This enabled me to rub some cream into his trotters and also on his spots which seem to have flared up again – does anyone know what they are from the pictures?

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