Second Cheese Making Class of April with Rob and Debbie

We held this class on a Tuesday and had the pleasure of Rob and Debbie.  Debbie is a radiographer and Rob works in

Debbie was very camera shy!

Debbie was very camera shy!

software has travelled all around the world.  Although they are both interested in cheese making, Rob is the one with a passion for cheese and wants to make more at home.

Two small crates renneting; I covered the top with pallet wrap to keep the heat in

Two small crates renneting; I covered the top with pallet wrap to keep the heat in

Because the class was on a Tuesday, we had already processed our milk the day before, so there was no large vat against which to compare.  But that did not matter as we had an excellent time making two pots of Wensleydale.

You can see in the photo to the left that we do not use a huge amount of equipment:

  • An inner and outer crate
  • Plastic jug
  • Colander
  • Spoon
  • Sharp knife
  • A bucket to decant whey into
Rob showing off his brick shaped block of curd after having taken the whey off

Rob proudly showing off his brick shaped block of curd after having taken the whey off

Ripening started at 30oC, we stirred every ten minutes until it was ready to

Rob getting a feel for the curd

Rob getting a feel for the curd

put the rennet in.  We achieved a good set which is a good sign of acidity nicely developing.

We cut, let the curd rest for five minutes or so and then we stirred gently with our hands so as not to damage the curd.

Eventually – it was a long haul as it is still cold in our little dairy, we got the curd to the ‘shotty’ stage and we decanted the whey.  There was a little competition to see who could make the best shaped block of curd, (Rob won!) but really, Rob and Debbie worked together well and helped each other pot up.

Then it was a case of turning until there was no more whey, then cutting into

Rob showing off his brick shaped block of curd after having taken the whey off

Potting up together

cubes, tumbling them around until once again, no more whey came out.  We did an acidity check at this stage just to show Rob and Debbie that we had indeed achieved the right acidity so they could achieve the same result at home without an acidity meter.

And then we had two pots of lovely, crumbly Wensleydale, which Rob and Debbie took away with them to finish pressing at home.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Ribblesdale Cheese

2 responses to “Second Cheese Making Class of April with Rob and Debbie

  1. karen digby

    I so much enjoy these posts, I learn a bit more detail of the process with each one. I am curious about the aging process for Wensleydale, as that is where failure occurs with my very amateur attempts at hard goat’s-milk cheese at home, (many thousands of miles from you). Can you one day (in your spare time, ha ha!) tell us a little about the “affinage” of your cheeses?

    Thanks so much for the entertainment and education! Karen (lover of Wensleydale and would-be cheesemaker)

    • HI Karen

      Am glad you find us interesting/entertaining!
      Drop me a line and let me know where you think you are going wrong and what it is you are doing.
      May not be able to help but will put my thinking cap on….

      With best wishes

      Iona

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s